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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2018 October;177(10):571-7

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.18.03586-6

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Exposure to low dose benzene in outdoor workers and effects on plasma prolactin levels

Maria V. ROSATI 1, Francesco TOMEI 2, Ottavia BALBI 1, Gianfranco TOMEI 3, Tiziana CACIARI 2, Vincenza ALZELMO 4, Donato P. DE CESARE 1, Francesco MASSONI 1, Carmina SACCO 1, Serafino RICCI 1

1 Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology, Medical-Legal and the Orthopedics, Specialty School of Occupational Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2 Spin off Sipro, Rome, Italy; 3 Department of Psychiatric and Psychological Science, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 4 Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Sacro Cuore Catholic University, Rome, Italy


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BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine if occupational exposure to low dose benzene had effects on plasma prolactin levels in outdoor workers of a big city.
METHODS: From a population of 1594 workers, we studied a group of 87 subjects. Each worker underwent blood sampling for the assessment of the blood benzene levels and the blood cell counts. The normal distribution of the different variables was tested using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov method. The t-test for two-mode variables (gender, smoke habit and working task) and the ANOVA test for more-than two-mode variables (age and working life) were performed on all subjects. We estimated the Pearson correlation index between the variables in the total sample and the subgroups divided according to gender, the smoking habit, and working task.
RESULTS: The study did not detect significant correlations between blood benzene levels and plasma prolactin levels in outdoor workers.
CONCLUSIONS: This study is to be considered preliminary, so we will make further studies by extending the case.


KEY WORDS: Air pollution - Benzene - Environmental monitoring - Prolactin

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