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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2013 April;172(4):283-8

Copyright © 2013 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Training on the Nintendo® Wii Fit™ Balance Board improves static balance in college-aged females

Bryan R. B., Jung A. P., Petrella J. K.

Department of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Samford University, Birmingham, AL, USA


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Aim: The aim of the study was to determine if training on the Nintendo® Wii Fit™ balance board could improve static balance in college-aged females.
Methods: Participants were excluded if they were collegiate athletes, dancers, or taking a yoga class. They were also excused if they were currently being treated for an injury to the hip, knee, ankle, or a concussion. Thirty-eight females were tested using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), and the participants with the worst balance scores (N.=24) were randomly placed into one of two groups: a control group (N.=12) or a training group (N.=12). The training group played Wii Fit™ balance games using a balance board twice a week for three weeks. The control group was asked to continue with their normal activities and could not begin yoga or dance classes. Both groups were re-tested using the BESS after three weeks.
Results: There was a significant decrease in BESS scores (P<0.001) between the pre-test (29.3±7.6) and post-test (16.1±5.0) scores of the Wii group. However, there was no significant difference between the pre-test (25.1±5.4) and post-test (22.5±8.6) scores in the control group (P>0.05). While the pre-test scores on the BESS were not significant between groups (P>0.05), the post-test scores between groups were significantly different (P=0.036).
Conclusion: These results suggest that balance can be improved in healthy college-aged females in as little as three weeks.

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