Home > Journals > Minerva Gastroenterology > Past Issues > Articles online first > Minerva Gastroenterology 2021 May 12

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

 

Minerva Gastroenterology 2021 May 12

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-5985.21.02914-4

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Nutraceuticals & microbiota: review

Luis E. DÍAZ-OROZCO 1, 2, Nahum MÉNDEZ-SÁNCHEZ 1, 2

1 National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 2 Liver Research Unit, Medica Sur Clinic & Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico


PDF


Nutraceuticals are defined as products isolated or purified from foods that are generally sold in medicinal or dosage forms not usually associated with food which is demonstrated to have a physiological benefit or provide protection against chronic disease. In this context, the products offered should be rigorously evaluated by international regulatory agencies. More recently, nutraceuticals have been proposed as a potential preventive and therapeutic option in the assessment of chronic diseases, mainly by altering the microbiome composition. However, the current lack of conclusive evidence supporting the “healthy” or “normal” microbiome, along with the dysbiosis concept paradigm, could be both contributing to the lack of homogeneous results. These issues may be solved in the next years with the use of emergent technologies in the individual’s microbiome assessment and its fluctuations in time or related to many factors, such as nutraceuticals. Additionally, future research assessing the independent association between the dysbiosis modification and any “potential” nutraceutical product (including bioactive ingredient or chemical compound in food) is going to enlarge the currently reduced “established nutraceuticals” group. In this work we have assessed the nutraceutical’s potential role as a microbiome-targeted manipulation therapy, and the gut-liver axis involved in the digestive diseases’ pathogenesis and progression, including the chronic liver diseases. Moreover, microbiome targeted nutraceuticals that show consistent results might be further included in clinical research and trials in the therapeutic assessment of chronic diseases. Finally, the indication of these quality microbiome-targeted nutraceuticals will undoubtedly carry health benefits for individuals.


KEY WORDS: Nutraceuticals; Microbiota; Dysbiosis; Liver diseases; Dietary supplements

top of page