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MINERVA GASTROENTEROLOGICA E DIETOLOGICA

A Journal on Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Dietetics


Indexed/Abstracted in: CAB, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index


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REVIEW  GUT MICROBIOTA AND GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, LIVER AND PANCREAS: FROM PHYSIOLOGY TO PATHOLOGY


Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica 2017 December;63(4):345-54

DOI: 10.23736/S1121-421X.17.02380-7

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Gut microbiota and gastric disease

Dolores SGAMBATO , Agnese MIRANDA, Lorenzo ROMANO, Marco ROMANO

Hepatogastroenterology Unit, L. Vanvitelli University of Campania, Naples, Italy


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The gut microbiota may be considered a crucial “organ” of human body because of its role in the maintenance of the balance between health as well as disease. It is mainly located in the small bowel and colon, while, the stomach was long thought to be sterile in particular for its high acid production. In particular, stomach was considered “a hostile place” for bacterial growth until the identification of Helicobacter pylori (HP). Now, the stomach and its microbiota can be considered as two different “organs” that share the same place and they have an impact on each other. Indeed, microscopic structures of gastric mucosa (mucus layer and luminal contents) influence local microflora and vice versa. In this article our attention is directed specifically to explain the effects of this “cross-talk” on gastric homeostasis. Gastric microbiota mainly consists of two general groups, namely HP and non-HP bacteria. Here, the relationship between these two populations will be reviewed, focusing on their role in the development of the different gastric disorders, i.e. functional dyspepsia, gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and gastric cancer. Moreover, we focus on the effects on the gastric microbiota of exogenous interference as diet and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).


KEY WORDS: Microbiota - Helicobacter pylori - Stomach neoplasms - Dyspepsia - Proton pump inhibitors

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Publication History

Issue published online: September 18, 2017
Article first published online: February 15, 2017

Cite this article as

Sgambato D, Miranda A, Romano L, Romano M. Gut microbiota and gastric disease. Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol 2017;63:345-54. DOI: 10.23736/S1121-421X.17.02380-7

Corresponding author e-mail

dolores.sgambato@gmail.com