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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2020 May 08

DOI: 10.23736/S1973-9087.20.06069-4

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Dance improves symptoms, functional mobility and fine manual dexterity in people with Parkinson disease: a quasi-experimental controlled efficacy study

Hewa H. KALYANI 1, 2, 3 , Karen A. SULLIVAN 4, 5, Gene M. MOYLE 6, Sandy BRAUER 7, Erica R. JEFFREY 8, 9, Graham K. KERR 1, 2

1 Movement Neuroscience Program, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; 2 School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; 3 Department of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka; 4 School of Psychology and Counselling, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; 5 Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; 6 School of Creative Practice, Faculty of Creative Industries, Brisbane, Australia; 7 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 8 Queensland Ballet, South Brisbane, Australia; 9 Dance for Parkinson's Australia, Brisbane, Australia



BACKGROUND: Clinically, individuals diagnosed with Parkinson disease (PD) present several symptoms that impact on their functional independence and quality of life. While there is accumulating evidence supporting dance as an effective symptom management option, few studies have objectively assessed these benefits, particularly related to the Dance for Parkinson’s Disease® (DfPD®) programme.
AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of DfPD®-based dance classes on disease-related symptoms, fine-manual dexterity and functional mobility in people with PD.
DESIGN: A quasi-experimental controlled efficacy study, with pre and post testing of two parallel groups (dance versus control).
SETTING: Community.
POPULATION: Thirty-three participants with PD allocated to one of two groups: dance group (DG; n = 17; age = 65.8 ± 11.7 years) or control group (CG: n = 16; age = 67.0 ± 7.7 years). They were cognitively intact (Addenbrooke’s score: DG = 93.2 ± 3.6, CG = 92.6 ± 4.3) and in early-stage of disease (Hoehn & Yahr: DG = 1.6 ± 0.7, CG = 1.5 ± 0.8).
METHODS: The DG undertook a one-hour DfPD®-based class, twice weekly for 12 weeks. The CG had treatment as usual. Both groups were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks on disease-related symptom severity (MDS-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale: MDS-UPDRS), fine-manual dexterity (Perdue Peg Board), measures of functional mobility (Timed Up & Go: single & dual task, Tinetti, Berg, Mini-BESTest) and self-rated balance and gait questionnaires (Activities Balance Confidence Scale: ABC-S; Gait and Falls: G&F-Q; Freezing of Gait: FOG).
RESULTS: Compared to the CG, there was significantly greater improvement in the DG pre-post change scores on measures of symptom severity MDS-UPDRS, dexterity, six measures of functional mobility, and the ABC-S, G&F-Q, FOG questionnaires.
CONCLUSIONS: DfPD®-based dance classes improved disease-related symptom severity, fine-manual dexterity, and functional mobility. Feasibility of the approach for a large scale RCT was also confirmed.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: DfPD® could be an effective supportive therapy for the management of symptoms and functional abilities in PD.


KEY WORDS: Parkinson's disease; Dance; Functional mobility; Fine manual dexterity

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