Home > Journals > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine > Past Issues > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2022 October;58(5) > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2022 October;58(5):715-22

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

Publishing options
eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   Open accessopen access

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2022 October;58(5):715-22

DOI: 10.23736/S1973-9087.22.07313-0

Copyright © 2022 THE AUTHORS

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license which allows users to copy and distribute the manuscript, as long as this is not done for commercial purposes and further does not permit distribution of the manuscript if it is changed or edited in any way, and as long as the user gives appropriate credits to the original author(s) and the source (with a link to the formal publication through the relevant DOI) and provides a link to the license.

language: English

Action observation and motor imagery have no effect on balance and freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease: a randomized controlled trial

Paula T. BEZERRA 1, Lorenna M. SANTIAGO 1, 2, Isaíra A. SILVA 1, Aline A. SOUZA 1, Camila L. PEGADO 1, Clécia M. DAMASCENA 3, Tatiana S. RIBEIRO 1, Ana R. LINDQUIST 1

1 Department of Physical Therapy, Rio Grande do Norte Federal University, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 2 Anita Garibaldi Education and Health Research Center, Santos Dumont Institute, Macaíba, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3 University of Estácio do Rio Grande do Norte (Fatern), Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil



BACKGROUND: Combining action observation (AO) and motor imagery (MI) training may induce greater brain activity in areas usually involved in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and lead to greater behavioral and neurophysiological effects than when used separately.
AIM: To determine the effects of combining AO, MI, and gait training on balance and freezing of gait in individuals with PD.
DESIGN: This is a single-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial.
SETTING: Laboratory of Intervention and Analysis of Movement (LIAM) from the Department of Physical Therapy of a Brazilian University.
POPULATION: Study sample consisted of individuals diagnosed with idiopathic PD by a neurologist specialized in movement disorders. METHODS: 39 individuals with PD were divided into experimental (EG=21) and control groups (CG=18). EG performed 12 sessions of AO, MI, and gait training, whereas CG watched PD-related educational videos and performed 12 sessions of gait training. Balance (measured using the Mini Balance Evaluation Systems Test [MiniBESTest]) and freezing of gait (measured using the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire) were reassessed one day after the end of the intervention.
RESULTS: We did not observe significant intra- and intergroup differences in freezing of gait. For the EG, we observed a significant intragroup difference in the total score of MiniBESTest (F=5.2; P=0.02), and sensory orientation (F=4.5; P=0.04) and dynamic gait (F=3.6; P=0.03) domains. MiniBESTest domains were not different between groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Combining AO, MI, and gait training was not more effective than isolated gait training for balance and freezing of gait in individuals with PD.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: MI training can moderate AO effects and enhance motor learning when both therapies are combined. Therefore, this approach may still have the potential to be included in the treatment of PD. New studies should investigate whether the factors that influence these results are related to the protocol’s sensitivity in changing the evaluated parameters or to the time and intensity of AO and MI training.


KEY WORDS: Parkinson disease; Postural balance; Freezing; Gait

top of page