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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2013 April;49(2):213-21

Copyright © 2013 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Role of the physical and rehabilitation medicine specialist regarding of children and adolescents with acquired brain injury

Varela-Donoso E. 1, Damjan H. 2, Muñoz-Lasa S. 1, Valero-Alcaide R. 1, Neumann V. 3, Chevignard M. 4, Berteanu M. 5, Christodoulou N. 6

1 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Complutense University School of Medicine, Madrid, Spain; 2 University Rehabilitation Institute of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; 3 Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds West Yorkshire, UK; 4 Rehabilitation Department for Children with, Acquired Brain Injury, Hôpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice, France; 5 Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine University Hospital Elias, Bucharest, Romania; 6 Department of Health Sciences, European University Cyprus, School of Sciences, Nicosia, Cyprus


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Acquired brain injury (ABI) is one of the most common causes of mortality and severe disability in children and adolescents. Those with ABI may suffer any of a wide range of disorders that may limit their activity, their participation in family and school life, and their involvement in society in general. This paper describes the different stages of recovery - hospitalisation, preparing for discharge, and long term follow-up, in which PRM specialists are involved. Although the involvement of the PRM specialist is important in all three stages, it is during the latter two stages when his or her expertise is particularly important. An interdisciplinary care team – which the PRM specialist is well placed to lead ‑ is required if the best results are to be achieved.

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