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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2012 March;48(1):161-5

Copyright © 2012 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

It is true that regional migratory osteoporosis has a full remission? A follow-up after 14 years. A case report

Swoopes F. 1, Mazzini N. 2, Centonze M. 3, Fancellu G. 1

1 School of Rehabilitation Medicine, Trieste University, Trieste, Italy; 2 Department of Rehabilitation, Villa Rosa Hospital, Pergine Valsugana, Trento, Italy; 3 Department of Radiology, S. Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy


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We describe the case of regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) followed up for 14 years after the first episode. RMO is an uncommon self-limiting condition that is clinically characterized by transient pain and functional limitation. It generally involves the epiphyses of the lower limbs and usually affects adult men and pregnant women. X-ray shows osteoporosis on comparative analysis and magnetic resonance imaging reveals a picture of spongy bone marrow edema. Blood chemistry test findings are negative. In the present case, RMO first developed in the left hip, then migrated to the right hip, and later to the left knee, and finally to the left foot. At latest follow-up, 14 years since the onset of RMO, the patient presented with a motility range impairment of the joint affected during the first episode.

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