Home > Journals > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine > Past Issues > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 September;45(3) > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 September;45(3):415-26

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES   Freefree

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 September;45(3):415-26

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Towards an outcome documentation in manual medicine: a first proposal of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) intervention categories for manual medicine based on a Delphi survey

Kirchberger I. 1, Stucki G. 1, 2, 3, Böhni U. W. 4, Cieza A. 1, 3, Kirschneck M. 1, Dvorak J. 5

1 ICF Research Branch of the WHO CC FIC (DIMDI), Institute for Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Germany 2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Munich University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Germany 3 Swiss Paraplegic Research, Notwill, Switzerland 4 Praxis ZeniT, Schaffhausen, Switzerland 5 Schulthess Klinik, Zurich, Switzerland


PDF


Aim. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a useful framework for the comprehensive description of the patients’ functional health. The aim of this study was to identify the ICF categories that represent the patients’ problems treated by manual medicine practitioners in order to facilitate its application in manual medicine. This selection of ICF categories could be used for assessment, treatment documentation and quality management in manual medicine practice.
Methods. Swiss manual medicine experts were asked about the patients’ problems commonly treated by manual medicine practitioners in a three-round survey using the Delphi technique. Responses were linked to the ICF.
Results. Forty-eight manual medicine experts gave a total of 808 responses that were linked to 225 different ICF categories; 106 ICF categories which reached an agreement of at least 50% among the participants in the final Delphi-round were included in the set of ICF Intervention Categories for Manual Medicine; 42 (40%) of the categories are assigned to the ICF component body functions, 36 (34%) represent the ICF component body structures and 28 (26%) the ICF component activities and participation.
Conclusion. A first proposal of ICF Intervention Categories for Manual Medicine was defined and needs to be validated in further studies.

top of page