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  PROTOCOLLO DI MINIMA PER L’ICTUS (PMIC - MINIMAL PROTOCOL FOR STROKE) Freefree

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2008 September;44(3):263-9

Copyright © 2008 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Developing a minimum data set for stroke patients assessment: the “Protocollo di Minima per l’Ictus” (PMIC) as a starting point towards an Italian stroke registry

Lenti G., Agosti M., Massucci M., Zampolini M., Paolucci S., Franceschini M.

1 Rehabilitation Unit, Piacenza and BorgonovoValTidone Hospitals Piacenza AUSL, Piacenza, Italy 2 Geriatrics and Rehabilitation Department University Hospital of Parma, Parma, Italy 3 Rehabilitation Unit, Passignano sul Trasimeno Hospital AUSL 2 of Umbria, Passignano, Perugia, Italy 4 Rehabilitation Department ASL 3 Umbria, Italy 5 Neurorehabilitation Unit IRCCS S. Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy 6 Medicine Rehabilitation NOCSAE Hospital AUSL of Modena, Modena, Italy


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Aim. The complex nature of stroke sequelae requires several assessment instruments to quantify correctly every residual symptom. As there was no general consensus on stroke evaluation among Italian Physiatrists, in 2004 the Italian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and S. Lucia Foundation (a Scientific Institute for hospitalization and treatment) established a Project Group to propose a standardized assessment tool (“Protocollo di Minima per l’Ictus – PMIC”) for acute, post-acute and community-living stroke patients. This tool aimed to be easy to use and comprehensive of all the elements necessary for accurately address the great range of different rehabilitation needs. The objective was to provide physiatrists with a standard assessment battery and to make prognostic factors available on large community samples.
Methods. From end 2004 to early 2006, the Project Group examined literature data on stroke assessment, prognostic factors and outcome and selected the specific data elements to be included in a data collection tool.
Results. A consensus was reached on a “minimum” core set of data. This protocol was peer submitted in early 2006, to test the burden of data collection, and to allow modifications and adjustments. Specific forms (file to download) for data collection and database to be shared (a dedicated “Client” software) are now freely offered by the Project Group for data collection.
Conclusion. PMIC is an evaluation procedure manageable in every-day practice and in every setting, a quick screening instrument that, given its large diffusion, can be expanded from a National Database into a National Rehabilitation Stroke Registry.

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