Home > Journals > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia > Past Issues > Articles online first > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2019 Dec 04

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

 

Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2019 Dec 04

DOI: 10.23736/S0392-0488.19.06405-8

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Pigmented purpuric dermatoses: analysis of epidemiological, clinical and histopathological aspects in relation to the prognosis of 70 patients, including infants and adults

Lidia SACCHELLI 1, Ambra DI ALTOBRANDO 1 , Cosimo MISCIALI 1, Carlotta BARALDI 1, Andrea SECHI 1, Fabio GUARALDI 2, Elisa VAROTTI 1, Ada DORMI 3, Elena NARDI 3, Annalisa PATRIZI 1

1 Division of Dermatology, Department of Specialized, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 2 Ophthalmology Unit, Department of Specialized, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 3 Department of Medical and Surgical Science, DIMEC, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy


PDF


BACKGROUND: Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPDs) are a group of chronic-relapsing, inflammatory purpuras without vasculitis that typically involve the lower limbs. Five major types could be distinguished, according to the clinical and histopathologic analysis. The etiopathogenesis is still unknown and multiple factors have been considered. Prognosis seems not to be influenced by the different clinical forms of PPDs; nevertheless no previous studies have investigated whether it could be influenced by the anatomical distribution of the disease.
METHODS: We enrolled 70 consecutive patients, including both adults and children with a clinical and histopathological diagnosis of PPD, to investigate possible correlations between the different types of PPDs, their anatomical distribution and prognosis.
RESULTS: We observed that patients, both adults and children, with an uncommon localization of the dermatoses, in particular with a diffuse localization (more than one body area affected), presented more frequently a persistent form of PPDs.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that attempts to relate the anatomical extension of PPDs and their evolution over time. According to our analysis, it seems to be a statistical significance for the prognosis only for patients with Schamberg disease and involvement of lower limbs. However, studies on a larger population are needed.


KEY WORDS: Pigmented purpuric dermatosis; Anatomical distribution; Topography; Prognosis

top of page