Home > Journals > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia > Past Issues > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2017 February;152(1) > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2017 February;152(1):36-45

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

REVIEW   

Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2017 February;152(1):36-45

DOI: 10.23736/S0392-0488.16.05425-0

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Melasma

Brian W. LEE 1, Robert A. SCHWARTZ 1, 2, Camila K. JANNIGER 1

1 Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA; 2 Rutgers University School of Public Affairs and Administration, Newark, NJ, USA


PDF


Melasma is a common acquired hypermelanosis that primarily affects women of skin type IV-VI. It tends to appear on sun-exposed areas of face and neck. The exact pathogenesis is linked with many factors include ultraviolet radiation, pregnancy, hormonal activity, thyroid abnormalities, and medications. Melasma, which involves increased melanin production and melanocytosis, may be principally epidermal, dermal, or mixed. Mainstays of treatment include topical hypopigmenting agents, lasers, chemical peels, and dermabrasion.


KEY WORDS: Melanosis - Hyperpigmentation - Ultraviolet rays

top of page