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ORIGINAL ARTICLE  VASCULAR SECTION 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2019 August;60(4):490-5

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.19.10706-9

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

EVOLUTION Study: 12-month results

Marc BOSIERS 1 , Koen DELOOSE 1, Joren CALLAERT 1, Patrick PEETERS 2, Jürgen VERBIST 2, Wouter van den EYNDE 2, Lieven MAENE 3, Roel BEELEN 3, Koen KEIRSE 4, Jeroen WAUTERS 5

1 AZ St-Blasius Hospital, Dendermonde, Belgium; 2 Imelda Hospital, Bonheiden, Belgium; 3 OLV Hospital, Aalst, Belgium; 4 R.Z. Heilig-Hart Hospital, Tienen, Belgium; 5 Flanders Medical Research Program (FMRP), Dendermonde, Belgium



BACKGROUND: The EVOLUTION Study is a prospective, non-randomized study, investigating the iVolution stent (iVascular, Barcelona, Spain). The study was conducted at the vascular departments of four hospitals in Belgium. This manuscript reports the findings up to 12-month follow-up time for the total cohort. The primary endpoint of the study is primary patency at 12 months. Primary patency is defined as a target lesion without a hemodynamically significant stenosis on duplex ultrasound (>50%, systolic velocity ratio no greater than 2.4) and without Target Lesion Revascularization (TLR) within 12 months.
METHODS: Between April 2015 and November 2016, 120 patients with TASC A&B femoropopliteal lesions were included. The mean lesion length was 89.63 mm. Most of the lesions were stenotic lesions (60.00%).
RESULTS: Primary patency rate for the total patient population was 86.30% at 12-month follow-up. Freedom from TLR at 12-month was 88.00%.
CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm the already existing enthusiasm of the use of bare metal self-expandable nitinol stents in the treatment of TASC A&B femoropopliteal lesions. Longer follow-up and a comparison or addition with drug-eluting technology has to be studied in the future.


KEY WORDS: Peripheral arterial disease; Stents; Femoral artery; Endovascular procedures

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