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REVIEW  RECENT ADVANCES IN ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM REPAIR 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2019 August;60(4):476-84

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.19.10942-1

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Bridging stent grafts in fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair: current practice and possible complications

David LINDSTRÖM 1 , Kevin MANI 1, Göran LUNDBERG 2, Anders WANHAINEN 1

1 Section of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 2 Department of Vascular Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden



Fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair (F/B-EVAR) is associated with a high degree of technical and clinical success. Despite this, studies have also reported high reintervention rates, and these are often related to the bridging stent grafts. Often new devices appear on the market before they have been tested in the bridging stent graft position. This review aims to assess the current literature on bridging stent grafts and discuss complications, illustrated by case reports. Complications reported with bridging stent grafts include; endoleak, kink, fracture, migration, occlusion, stenosis and perforation. Some known risk factors for bridging stent occlusions are renal artery stent grafts vs. SMA and celiac artery stent grafts. Some device specific complications have also been reported such as type IIIc endoleak with the Lifestream stent graft (Bard Peripheral Vascular, Tempe, AZ, USA) fractures and type IIId endoleaks with the 1st generation of Begraft (BentleyInnoMed, Hechingen, Germany). In addition, this review also discusses some newer devices with possible relation to complications such as stenosis and target vessel perforation. In conclusion, bridging stent grafts in fenestrated and branched aortic repair have a good midterm patency. Despite this, remaining issues are often related to the bridging stent grafts. Thorough follow-up and attention are needed, especially when new devices are introduced. The endovascular community should work towards a common global feedback system.


KEY WORDS: Stents; Aortic aneurysm; Endovascular procedures

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