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REVIEW  RECENT ADVANCES IN ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM REPAIR 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2019 August;60(4):468-75

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.19.10946-9

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Management of abdominal aortic aneurysm and concomitant malignant disease

Bernard PEETERS, Nathalie MOREELS, Frank VERMASSEN, Isabelle van HERZEELE

Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium



INTRODUCTION: Concomitant malignant disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) represent a challenging issue in terms of treatment priority, timing and perspectives. This systematic review provides an overview of the available literature about AAA and concomitant malignant disease.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We conducted a literature search of all the English-language medical literature in Medline (through PubMed), Embase, Clinical Trial databases and the Cochrane Library up to December 31st, 2018.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The literature about AAA and concomitant malignant disease is mostly based on retrospective small case series. Two recently published meta-analyses focusing on the management of AAA and concomitant abdominal neoplasms came to the same conclusion “treat what is most threatening or symptomatic first.” The threshold to treat asymptomatic AAA should not be altered in patients with AAA and concomitant cancer including cases under chemotherapy. An asymptomatic AAA of at least 55 mm anatomically suitable for EVAR, should only be treated first in patients with at least a life expectancy of two years followed by staged cancer surgery two weeks later.
CONCLUSIONS: Decisions about management of AAA and concomitant malignant disease should be based on clinical judgment applied individually in a multidisciplinary setting (“treat first what kills first”). The indication for treatment is not different than in patients with AAA without cancer. A staged approach is preferable and ideally the AAA should be excluded by endovascular means if anatomically suitable. An international registry should be initiated to gather more evidence about the management and outcomes of patients with AAA and concomitant carcinoma.


KEY WORDS: Abdominal aortic aneurysm; Comorbidity; Neoplasms; Endovascular procedures

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