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REVIEW  MANAGEMENT OF DESCENDING THORACIC AORTA DISEASES 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2019 June;60(3):275-80

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.19.10911-1

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The most relevant unmet needs in endovascular management of descending thoracic aorta

Vincent RIAMBAU 1, Carla BLANCO AMIL 1 , Laura CAPOCCIA 2, Gaspar MESTRES 1, Xavier YUGUEROS 1

1 Division of Vascular Surgery, Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2 Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Umberto I Polyclinic, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy



Endovascular repair of descending thoracic aorta (DTA) is considered as first interventional option for most part of the aortic disorders. However, many unmet needs and issues are still limiting its applicability. One of the major limitations is related to the existing gaps in evidence. Clear and robust evidence is still needed in many aspects of the management of DTA pathologies. In numerous clinical scenarios, adequate trials are lacking. Besides those gaps in evidence, it is well recognized that thoracic endografting (TEVAR) is technically evolving in order to overcome technical and device-related complications and limitations. We can deploy endografts in any aortic segment: in the descending, in the ascending, in the arch, even preserving aortic branches. Nevertheless, from the pure technical point of view, current generations of endografts still need more development and improvement. Durability remains the major concern for any endovascular treatment, and thoracic endografting is not an exception. As Galenus said, the physician is only nature’s assistant, thoracic endograft should also follow the natural anatomy instead of fighting against it. We will focus the following pages on the graft conformability and compliance, both related to durability and safety of thoracic endografting. We will review the current knowledge and concerns associated with the anatomical and hemodynamic modifications induced by the thoracic endograft strength, stiffness and straightness and their implications for the future thoracic endograft designs.


KEY WORDS: Dissecting aneurysm; Thoracic aorta; Stents; Vascular grafting

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