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REVIEW  RECENT ADVANCES IN ATHERECTOMY IN PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2019 April;60(2):212-20

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.19.10879-8

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Orbital atherectomy for calcified femoropopliteal lesions: a current review

Fadi SAAB 1 , Brad J. MARTINSEN 2, Dylan WREDE 2, Ann BEHRENS 2, George L. ADAMS 3, Jihad MUSTAPHA 1

1 Advanced Cardiac and Vascular Amputation Prevention Centers, Michigan State University, School of Medicine, Grand Rapids, MI, USA; 2 Scientific Affairs, Clinical, Cardiovascular Systems Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA; 3 North Carolina Heart and Vascular, Rex Hospital, UNC School of Medicine, Raleigh, NC, USA



The orbital atherectomy system is a novel form of atherectomy that uses orbital sanding and pulsatile forces, an effective method of treatment for peripheral atherosclerotic lesions with varying levels of occlusion. Although the devices only has a general indication from the FDA to treat atherosclerotic lesions, they are effective in treating all kinds of lesions, and can therefore mitigate effects of all severities of peripheral artery disease. This approach to endovascular therapy involves the use of differential sanding to preferentially ablate fibrous, fibrofatty and calcified lesions, while deflecting healthy intima away from the crown. The eccentrically mounted crown design allows the device to employ rhythmic pulsating forces that penetrate the medial layer, and cause cracking in the lesions in order to facilitate easier balloon inflation and intravascular drug elution. The combination of vessel modification and lumen enlargement through sanding can effectively restore blood flow to the extremities, and can eliminate risk of critical limb ischemia, as well as subsequent amputation. Extensive lab testing and clinical trials have confirmed the high success rates and low major adverse events associated with this form of treatment. The device is economically viable as well, since its cost is offset by the lower frequency of adjunctive therapy sessions when compared to other devices. Considering the results outlined in this manuscript, the Diamondback 360° is an effective form of atherectomy therapy for peripheral artery disease. In-depth understanding of the operation preparation, procedure, and best imaging techniques can help to optimize outcomes.


KEY WORDS: Atherectomy - Peripheral arterial disease - Atherosclerosis

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