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REVIEW  RECENT ADVANCES IN ATHERECTOMY IN PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2019 April;60(2):198-204

DOI: 10.23736/S0021-9509.19.10866-X

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Directional atherectomy with antirestenotic therapy for the treatment of no-stenting zones

Antoine SAUGUET , Raphaël PHILIPPART, Benjamin HONTON

Interventional Cardiovascular Group, Pasteur Toulouse Clinic, Pasteur GCVI Clinic, Toulouse, France



Endovascular treatment for peripheral artery occlusive disease carries unresolved problem of restenosis. Treatment modalities in areas of high mechanical stress like popliteal artery and common femoral artery remains challenging. New-generation devices improved the results of stent therapy in this anatomical territory, but could impact on future surgical options if they are needed. Vessel preparation prior to drug (paclitaxel)-coated balloons (DCB) angioplasty leads to better paclitaxel penetration into the arterial wall and improved drug uptake. The “leave nothing behind” strategies, DCB angioplasty and combined directional atherectomy (DA) and antirestenotic therapy (DAART), can theoretically overcome the problems caused by the mobility of the knee joint. However, calcified and longer lesions remain a challenging subset that is less responsive to DCBs, resulting in higher provisional stent rates. For the treatment of long and calcified femoropopliteal lesions, vessel preparation with DA before DCB angioplasty seems to be safe in mid-term follow-up and might have benefits in more challenging lesion subsets that are at higher risk for acute and chronic technical treatment failure of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, including DCB angioplasty, such as severely calcified lesions. Treatment with DA+DCB resulted in both increased technical success and fewer flow-limiting dissections compared with treatment with DCB alone. In concept of “leave nothing behind” therapies for isolated popliteal artery lesions, DAART was associated with a higher primary patency rate than DCB angioplasty alone.


KEY WORDS: Atherectomy - Peripheral arterial disease - Endovascular procedures

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