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Acta Phlebologica 2019 August;20(2):57-60

DOI: 10.23736/S1593-232X.19.00446-6

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Lymphedema and the mobilization of intracellular and extracellular fluids with intensive treatment

Jose M. PEREIRA DE GODOY 1, 2 , Henrique J. PEREIRA DE GODOY 3, Ana C. PEREIRA DE GODOY 4, 5, Thatiany GRACIANO DE MARQUI 3, M. Fátima GUERREIRO GODOY 1, 5

1 Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Medicine School of Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil; 2 Brazilian National Council for Research and Development (CNPq), Brasilia, Brazil; 3 School of Medicine, Godoy Clinic, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil; 4 Unit of Pediatric Intensive Therapy, Santa Casa de São Paulo, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil; 5 Godoy Clinic, São Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil



BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the mobilization of intracellular and extracellular fluids in the limbs and trunk with intensive treatment for low limb lymphedema.
METHODS: Ten patients with lower limb lymphedema were evaluated: seven females and three males. The diagnosis of lymphedema was based on clinical findings and electrical bioimpedance analysis. All patients were submitted to intensive treatment from six to eight hours a day for one week. Treatment consisted of mechanical lymphatic drainage (six to eight hours), manual drainage (one hour), cervical stimulation (15 minutes) and compression stockings. The patients were submitted to a clinical evaluation and electrical bioimpedance analysis before and after treatment.
RESULTS: A significant reduction in intracellular and extracellular water was found in the affected limbs and an increase in intracellular and extracellular water was found in the upper limbs and trunk.
CONCLUSIONS: Intensive treatment for lymphedema using the Godoy method leads to the mobilization of fluids throughout the body, with a reduction in the volume of affected limbs and an increase in unaffected limbs.


KEY WORDS: Lymphedema; Therapeutics; Manual lymphatic drainage

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