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Original Article   

Otorhinolaryngology 2022 Jun 01

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-6302.22.02446-X

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Efficacy of Yacovino Maneuver for anterior canal-benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a multicentric prospective study

Pasquale VIOLA 1, Gianluca LEOPARDI 2, Davide PISANI 1 , Alessia ASTORINA 1, Niccolò CERCHIAI 2 , Francesco MANTI 3, Alfonso SCARPA 4, Federico M. GIOACCHINI 5, Giuseppe CHIARELLA 1

1 Unit of Audiology, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Regional Center for Cochlear Implants and ENT Diseases, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy; 2 Unit of Otolaryngology, S. Giuseppe Hospital, Empoli, Firenze, Italy; 3 U.O.C. Radiodiagnostics, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy; 4 Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy; 5 Ear, Nose, and Throat Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy


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BACKGROUND: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo BPPV of the anterior canal (AC) is the less frequent form between the BPPV. AC is in the upper side of the posterior labyrinth above both the Posterior Canal (PC) and Lateral Canal (LC) and the non-ampullary arm slopes directly into the common crus and then into the vestibule. This anatomical setting makes otoconial debris less likely to enter the AC and should also facilitate spontaneous self-elimination by gravity. Several therapeutic maneuvers were proposed for AC-BPPV treatment, but none has shown good efficacy. Aim of this multicenter study is to verify the Yacovino Maneuver (YM) effectiveness in AC-BPPV treatment.
METHODS: Analysis of the results of treatment with Yacovino Maneuver (YM) in 23 patients affected by BPPV of the AC.
RESULTS: All patients treated with YM achieve complete recovery. 8/23 patients (34.8%) required only one session with one or more maneuvers, while in 15/23 patients (65.2%) two or more sessions were required.
CONCLUSIONS: YM is an effective canalith repositioning procedure for AC-BPPV with a 100% recovery rate. In our experience this maneuver often requires more repetitions either in the same session or, if necessary, in subsequent sessions.


KEY WORDS: Anterior canal; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; Yacovino maneuver; Nystagmus; Followup diagnosis

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