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Italian Journal of Dermatology and Venereology 2021 December;156(6):637-41

DOI: 10.23736/S2784-8671.21.06987-5

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Interrupting aerosol spread and nasal acquisition of SARS-CoV-2 with topical trichloroacetic acid

Zbigniew RUSZCZAK 1, 2 , Dimitre T. DIMITROV 3, 4, Shaden ABDELHADI 3, Zlatina M. FILIPOVA 5, 6, Robert A. SCHWARTZ 7

1 College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 2 Sheikh Shakhbout Medical City, Mayo Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 3 Division of Dermatology, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 4 Ministry of Presidential Affairs, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 5 Elysee DSMC, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 6 Amrita Wellness Clinic, Birkirkara, Malta; 7 Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA



The devastating effects of the coronavirus designated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have merited many approaches to combat COVID-19. Since it is transmitted largely by fine droplets and aerosols, air defense with suitable ventilation and mask use might be enhanced by attacking the virus and its likely main point of invasion, the nasal mucosa. We recommend formal clinical trials employing topical trichloroacetic acid (TCA), which successfully blocks the nasal entry point for airborne allergens and to be curative for the early stages of viral infections of the oral mucosa. TCA chemically redesigns the nasal and nasopharyngeal epithelia to in effect remove receptors and cell, allowing SARS-CoV-2 viral attachment. TCA fits the ideal category for medication, being inexpensive, readily available, easy-to-use, and proven to be safe for suggested use. We postulate its potential efficacy in SARS-CoV-2 infection and urge consideration of clinical trials. Local delivery of TCA in the form of contact application directly to the nasal cavity may have a preventive effect, potentially neutralizing virus entry and subsequential virus spread to the lower respiratory tract, especially for those at high risk. In addition, TCA may diminish the local viral load and its replication potential in those newly infected.


KEY WORDS: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Infections, prevention and control; Trichloroacetic acid

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