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ULTIMO FASCICOLOTHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 Dicembre;55(12):1555-64

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

The impact of a simulated grand tour on sleep, mood, and well-being of competitive cyclists

Lastella M. 1, Roach G. D. 1, Halson S. L. 2, Martin D. T. 2, West N. P. 3, Sargent C. 1

1 Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, SA, Australia;
2 Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, ACT, Australia;
3 Molecular Basis of Disease, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, QLD, Australia

AIM: Professional cycling is considered one of the most demanding of all endurance sports. The three major professional cycling stages races (i.e. Tour de France, Giro d’Italia and Vuelta a España) require cyclists to compete daily covering between ~150-200 km for three consecutive weeks. Anecdotal evidence indicates that such an event has a significant effect on the sleep, mood, and general well-being of cyclists, particularly during the latter stages of the event. The primary aim of this study was to simulate a grand tour and determine the impact a grand tour has on the sleep, mood, and general well-being of competitive cyclists.
METHODS: Twenty-one male cyclists (M±SD, age 22.2±2.7 years) were examined for 39 days across three phases (i.e. baseline, simulated grand tour, and recovery). Sleep was assessed using sleep diaries and wrist activity monitors. Mood and general well-being were assessed using the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) and Visual Analogue Scales (VAS).
RESULTS: The amount and quality of sleep as assessed by the wrist activity monitors declined during the simulated grand tour. In contrast, self-reported sleep quality improved throughout the study. Cyclists’ mood and general well-being as indicated by vigour, motivation, physical and mental state declined during the simulated tour.
CONCLUSION: Future investigations should examine sleep, mood and well-being during an actual grand tour. Such data could prove instrumental toward understanding the sleep and psychological changes that occur during a grand tour.

lingua: Inglese


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