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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 February;54(1):43-52

lingua: Inglese

Self-paced cycling performance and recovery under a hot and highly humid environment after cooling

Gonzales B. R. 1, Hagin V. 1, Guillot R. 1, Placet V. 2, Monnier-Benoit P. 1, Groslambert A. 1

1 Laboratory C3S – Culture Sports Health and Society Sport and Health Department University of Franche‑Comté, Besançon, France;
2 Laboratory of Applied Mechanics, Femto-ST University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France


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Aim: This study investigated the effects of pre- and post-cooling on self-paced time-trial cycling performance and recovery of cyclists exercising under a hot and highly humid environment (29.92 °C-78.52% RH).
Methods: Ten male cyclists performed a self-paced 20-min time trial test (TT20) on a cyclo-ergometer while being cooled by a cooling vest and a refrigerating headband during the warm-up and the recovery period. Heart rate, power output, perceived exertion, thermal comfort, skin and rectal temperatures were recorded.
Results: Compared to control condition (222.78±47 W), a significant increase (P<0.05) in the mean power output during the TT20 (239.07±45 W; +7.31%) was recorded with a significant (P<0.05) decrease in skin temperature without affecting perceived exertion, heart rate, or rectal temperature at the end of the TT20. However, pace changes occurred independently of skin or rectal temperatures variations but a significant difference (P<0.05) in the body’s heat storage was observed between both conditions. This result suggests that a central programmer using body’s heat storage as an input may influence self-paced time-trial performance. During the recovery period, post-cooling significantly decreased heart rate, skin and rectal temperatures, and improved significantly (P<0.05) thermal comfort.
Conclusion: Therefore, in hot and humid environments, wearing a cooling vest and a refrigerating headband during warm-up improves self-paced performance, and appears to be an effective mean of reaching skin rest temperatures more rapidly during recovery.

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gonzalesbenoit@hotmail.com