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ULTIMO FASCICOLOTHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2013 Ottobre;53(5):533-7

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 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Running a 100-km ultra-marathon induces an inflammatory response but does not raise the level of the plasma iron-regulatory protein hepcidin

Kasprowicz K. 1, Ziemann E. 2, Ratkowski W. 3, Laskowski R. 2, Kaczor J. J. 4, Dadci R. 5, Antosiewicz J. 6

1 Department of Biology and Ecology, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdańsk, Poland;
2 Department of Physiology, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdańsk, Poland;
3 Department of Physical Recreation, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdańsk, Poland;
4 Department of Bioenergetics and Physiology of Exercise, Medical University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland;
5 Department of Psychology of Health, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdańsk, Poland;
6 Department of Biochemistry, Academy of Physical Education and Sport, Gdańsk, Poland

Aim: Exercise may induce an inflammatory response that may lead to changes in iron metabolism. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the inflammation induced by a 100 km run and the level of hepcidin, which is a hormone regulating iron metabolism.
Methods: Six males, age 44.5±13.5 years, running 100 km. Setting: the CRP protein, IL-6 and leucocyte count were measured as an index of inflammation.
Results: A 100 km run caused a progressive increase in blood IL-6 concentration, which reached the highest values after 75 km. Furthermore, an increase in levels of CRP, a marker of inflammation, was observed after the 100 km run and continued to increase after a 14 h recovery period. Leucocyte number and markers of muscle damage were significantly elevated after the 100 km run. This was accompanied by a decrease in transferrin saturation and an increase in blood haemoglobin and ferritin. Despite all these changes, the 100 km race did not affect blood hepcidin concentration either during the run or after a 14 h recovery period.
Conclusion: The study shows that a 100 km run induces an inflammatory response but does not trigger changes in the blood hepcidin level. Thus it can be concluded that changes in IL-6 are not sufficient to increase the blood hepcidin level in runners.

lingua: Inglese


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