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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2013 Ottobre;53(5):461-9

lingua: Inglese

Measurement of pulmonary gas exchange variables and lactic anaerobic capacity during field testing in elite indoor football players

Angius L. 1, Cominu M. 1, Filippi M. 1, Piredda C. 1, Migliaccio G. M. 2, Pinna M. 1, Milia R. 1, Tocco F. 1, Concu A. 1, Crisafulli A. 1

1 Department of Medical Science, Sport Physiology Lab. University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy;
2 Regional School of Sport of Sardinia, Italian Olympic Committee, Cagliari, Italy


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Aim: The aims of this study were: 1) to examine the gas exchange responses of elite indoor football players to a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test; and 2) to verify whether or not the excess of carbon dioxide production (CO2excess) correlates with blood lactate accumulation during RSA field testing.
Methods: Eleven elite male indoor football players were recruited. A preliminary incremental exercise test on a treadmill was performed to elicit V’O2max. Then, participants underwent an RSA test consisting in a shuttle running through a course with various changes of direction while wearing a portable gas analyzer able to provide values of oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, and CO2excess. BLa concentrations during recovery were also measured.
Results: The main results were that: 1) during the RSA test subjects did not reached the V’O2max level achieved in the preliminary test; 2) during the RSA test BLa levels were higher compared with the preliminary test; 3) the peak BLa concentration during recovery was significantly correlated with the average CO2excess
Conclusion: It was concluded that the RSA test did not appear to be useful to elicit V’O2max. Rather, it seemed suitable to recruit subjects’ lactic anaerobic capacity. Moreover, CO2excess appeared suitable for qualitatively estimate BLa accumulation during field testing.

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crisafulli@tiscali.it