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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

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Original articles  PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANISMS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2010 March;50(1):25-31

lingua: Inglese

Oxygen cost of sprint training

Berg K., Buresh R., Parks L., Kissinger K., Karasek D., Sinnett A., Trehearn T.

University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA


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AIM: The purpose of the study was to profile the oxygen uptake of sprinters during various portions of a typical sprint training workout.
METHODS: This was a descriptive study of 11 female sprinters and jumpers on an NCAA Division II university track team. Subjects were assessed for V.O2max, and V.O2 and HR kinetics during a 65 min typical sprint training session on a treadmill. The sprint session included a warm-up, static stretching, acceleration runs, 8x20 s sprints at 150% of velocity V.O2max (vV.O2max) with a 3-min walk recovery, and a cool-down.
RESULTS: Mean V.O2 and HR (M±SD) for the entire 65 min sprint training session were 19.1±7.6 mL/kg/min and 138.7±24.0 b/min, respectively. V.O2 rose to 33 mL/kg/min during and immediately following each 20 s sprint which represented 73% of V.O2max. V.O2 during and after each sprint remained nearly constant (P>0.05) rather than rising as hypothesized.
CONCLUSION: V.O2 during a 65 min sprint training workout in female college athletes varies greatly but was elevated to 33 mL/kg/min following each 20 s sprint. V.O2 did not rise across the series of eight sprints. These results suggest that chronic sprint training may elicit a moderate aerobic training effect. Implications for training are discussed.

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kberg@unomaha.edu