Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 Giugno;46(2) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 Giugno;46(2):248-56

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111


eTOC

 

Original articles  BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION (ergogenics)


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 Giugno;46(2):248-56

lingua: Inglese

Does a pre-exercise carbohydrate feeding improve a 20-km cross-country ski performance?

Francescato M. P., Puntel I.

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Technologies University of Udine, Udine, Italy


PDF  


Aim. Carbohydrates are known to improve exercise performance, but their effects on actual competitions are not studied in detail. Aim of the present work was to evaluate the effects of maltodextrins ingestion on a simulated cross-country ski competition.
Methods. Ten athletes (15-24 years) repeated twice, in random order, a 20-km time-trial; 45 min prior to the start, they consumed 508±64 mL of a beverage containing either 0.7 g·kg-1 body mass of maltodextrins or carbohydrate free placebo.
Results. Blood glucose, lactate and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured periodically; heart rate was acquired continuously. Maltodextrins ingestion did not affect the increase in lactate and RPE at the end of the trial (5.2±3.7 mmol·L-1 and 17.5±2.2), nor heart rate, which was constant throughout the exercises (177.1±4.3 bpm). The environmental conditions changed statistically in the second experimental session (-10.2±1.8°C vs -0.8±0.5°C for snow temperature, P<0.05), giving rise to shorter performance times of all the athletes (67.9±5.9 min vs 63.5±5.8 min, P<0.005). Within each session, the average performance time of the athletes receiving maltodextrins was shorter, even if not significantly. However, the difference in performance time of the group fed with the maltodextrins the 2nd day, was statistically higher (6.1±1.7 min vs 3.4±1.5 min, P<0.03). The effects of maltodextrins ingestion were disentangled mathematically, leading to an estimated gain in performance time of 2%.
Conclusion. In spite of the different environmental conditions during the 2 experimental sessions, the illustrated results suggest an improvement of total performance time following the maltodextrins feeding.

inizio pagina

Publication History

Per citare questo articolo

Corresponding author e-mail