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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport


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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 June;46(2):197-201

lingua: Inglese

Contribution of muscular strength in cardiorespiratory fitness tests

Flouris A. D. 1, Metsios G. S. 2, Koutedakis Y. 2, 3

1 Environmental Ergonomics Laboratory School of Health and Human Performance Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
2 School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure Wolverhampton University, Walshall, UK
3 Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece


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Aim. Reports from laboratory-based studies have revealed a relationship between resistance training and endurance performance in both trained and untrained individuals. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of lower extremity muscular strength levels in performing cardiorespiratory fitness tests in laboratory, as well as field-based settings.
Methods. Within 2 weeks 38 healthy males (age 21.6±2.5 years, body mass index—BMI—24.4±2.2) performed three maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) assessments using the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MSR), the 20 m square shuttle run test (SSR), and a maximal treadmill test (MT) to exhaustion. Data were also obtained from knee flexion and extension isokinetic dynamometry at 60°·s-1.
Results. MSR performance correlated with the peak torque generated from both legs at r=0.63 (P<0.001). The equivalent for SSR was significant at r=0.44 (P<0.05), while MT demonstrated a non-significant positive correlation coefficient (r=0.34, P>0.05). Stepwise regression analyses revealed that the inclusion of leg strength parameters increased the coefficient of determination by 9% (P<0.001) and 4% (P<0.05) in the MSR and SSR, respectively. The MT model was not significantly associated with any of the isokinetic indices studied.
Conclusion. Although moderately significant, the present coefficients suggest that performance in the present field-based cardiorespiratory fitness tasks is affected to a certain extent by lower extremity muscular strength. The latter also demonstrates a positive relationship with laboratory-based performance.

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