Home > Riviste > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Fascicoli precedenti > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 September;44(3) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 September;44(3):315-21

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,215


eTOC

 

Original articles  BIOCHEMISTRY


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2004 September;44(3):315-21

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Hematological recovery in male ultramarathon runners: the effect of variations in training load and running time

Peters E. M. 1, Robson P. J. 2, Kleinveldt N. C. 1, Naicker V. L. 3, Jogessar V. D. 3

1 Department of Physiology School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine University of Natal, Durban, South Africa 2 Department of Physiological Sciences University of Stellenbosch, South Africa 3 Department of Haematology, Faculty of Medicine University of Natal, Durban, South Africa


PDF  


Aim. Haematological response to the 2001 downhill Comrades Marathon was compared in high (>120 km/w in training; 3 weeks of pre-race taper) and low (<80 km/w in training; 2 weeks of pre-race taper) training status groups.
Methods. Full blood counts, differential lymphocyte counts (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD56), serum cortisol, C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured in blood samples donated 21 hours before and 16 hours after a 90 km ultramarathon.
Results. Despite significantly faster mean race finishing time (8.03 h vs 10.53 h; p<0.001) and greater percentage incidence (55.6% vs 40%) of post-race upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in the highly trained group, these faster runners did not show evidence of a slower post-race recovery in terms of total leukocyte, neutrophil, total or differential lymphocyte counts (p>0.05). CRP concentrations were, however, markedly higher in the slower, less trained group (65.3±10.7 vs 38.3±5.9; p<0.01).
Conclusion. Despite greater systemic evidence of post-race muscle inflammation and an acute phase response in the slower runners in a downhill ultramarathon race, the haematological recovery of well trained runners who undergo a 3-week taper period prior to the ultramarathon is not different to that in less trained runners who spend almost 3 hours longer on the road. The higher prevalence of post-race URTI symptoms in the fast, well trained group does not appear to be related to lymphocyte recovery in peripheral blood.

inizio pagina

Publication History

Per citare questo articolo

Corresponding author e-mail