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ULTIMO FASCICOLOTHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

Rivista di Medicina, Traumatologia e Psicologia dello Sport

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Periodicità: Mensile

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 Giugno;42(2):158-64

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

 Original articles

The influence of acute hypoxia on the prediction of maximal oxygen uptake using multi-stage shuttle run test

Neya M., Ogawa Y., Matsugaki N., Kimura K. *, Yoshida R. **, Kobayashi K.

From the Sports Sciences, Department of Life Sciences Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
*Takenaka Corporation, Tokyo, Japan
**Tabai Espec Corporation, Tokyo, Japan

Background. The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to inves­ti­gate chang­es in pre­dict­ed max­i­mal oxy­gen ­uptake (˙VO2max) by the mul­ti­stage shut­tle run ­test (­MSSR) and sev­er­al phys­io­log­i­cal param­e­ters in ­MSSR ­under nor­mox­ia and two hypox­ic con­di­tions and the influ­enc­es of ­acute hypox­ia on ­these chang­es in ­MSSR.
Methods. Experimental ­design: six col­lege ­long dis­tance run­ners (LR), sev­en col­lege rug­by ath­letes (RG) and ­eight ­untrained col­lege ­males (UM) per­formed incre­men­tal run­ning ­test on the tread­mill and ­MSSR in 17.5% (HYP17.5%) and 15.5% (HYP15.5%) of oxy­gen con­cen­tra­tion and nor­mox­ia (NOR20.9%). Measures: ˙VO2max was meas­ured by the tread­mill pro­to­col and pre­dict­ed by ­MSSR. Maximal ­heart ­rate (HRmax) and max­i­mal ­blood lac­tate con­cen­tra­tion (BLamax) ­were record­ed at the ter­mi­na­tion of ­each ­test.
Results. Significant cor­re­la­tion was ­observed ­between meas­ured ˙VO2max by the tread­mill pro­to­col (57.2±8.3 ml·kg-1·min-1) and pre­dict­ed ˙VO2max in NOR20.9% (54.6±8.0 ml·kg-1·min-1) (r=0.80, p<0.05). Also ­strong cor­re­la­tions in pre­dict­ed ˙VO2max ­between NOR20.9% and HYP17.5% (51.1±8.0 ml·kg-1·min-1) (r=0.90, p<0.05) and ­between NOR20.9% and HYP15.5% (48.1±7.3 ml·kg-1·min-1) (r=0.82, p<0.05) ­were ­observed.
Conclusions. The ­results ­show ­that ­although ­MSSR under­pred­icts ˙VO2max, it is effec­tive to eval­u­ate aero­bic pow­er and can ­detect the influ­ence of oxy­gen con­cen­tra­tion on aero­bic pow­er. The spe­cif­ic move­ment of ­MSSR may ­affect the per­for­mance of LR but ­MSSR can ­describe the influ­ence of hypox­ia on the per­for­mance of LR com­pared to nor­mox­ia. Thus ­MSSR can be ­used to eval­u­ate the influ­ence of hypox­ia or alti­tude on aero­bic pow­er as a ­field ­test.

lingua: Inglese


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