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Original articles  BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 March;42(1):56-64

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Physiological responses to weight-loss intervention in inactive obese African-American and Caucasian women

Glass J. N., Miller W. C., Szymanski L. M., Fernhall B., Durstine J. L.

From the Exercise Science Programs The George Washington University Medical Center Washington, D.C., USA *Department of Exercise Science University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA


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Background. The phys­io­log­i­cal respons­es of inac­tive ­obese pre­men­o­pau­sal African-American and Caucasian wom­en to the iden­ti­cal exer­cise train­ing and behav­ior mod­ifi­ca­tion pro­gram ­were com­pared.
Methods. Inactive ­obese (96.1±2.9 kg, BMI=34.8±0.7 kg/m2, % ­body fat=46.0±0.8; ­mean±SEM) pre­men­o­pau­sal (36±2 yrs) African-American (n=10) and Caucasian (n=19) wom­en ­were includ­ed. Resting meta­bol­ic ­rate (RMR), res­pir­a­to­ry ­exchange ­ratio (RER), and max­i­mal aero­bic pow­er (V.O2max) ­were meas­ured by indi­rect cal­o­rim­e­try, and ­body com­po­si­tion by ple­thys­mog­ra­phy. Resting and max­i­mal ­heart ­rates, ­blood glu­cose and lip­ids, and ­blood pres­sure ­were ­also meas­ured. Treatment con­sist­ed of a 13-­week ­diet and exer­cise behav­ior mod­ifi­ca­tion pro­gram. Group ­mean com­par­i­sons ­were ­made ­with a Student’s “t”-­test or an ANCO­VA, ­which con­trolled for indi­vid­u­al dif­fer­enc­es in ­body ­mass and ­lean ­body ­mass (LBM). Significance was set at p<0.05.
Results. Initially, the ­groups ­were not sig­nif­i­cant­ly dif­fer­ent in ­height, ­mass, BMI, age, % ­body fat, fat ­mass, LBM, ­girth meas­ure­ments, RMR, ­RER, V.O2max, ­blood pres­sure, or cho­les­te­rol pro­file. The num­ber of ­weeks com­plet­ed, num­ber of exer­cise ses­sions com­plet­ed, ­total min­utes of exer­cise for the ­entire inter­ven­tion, aver­age min­utes of dai­ly exer­cise, and ­total esti­mat­ed exer­cise ener­gy expen­di­ture ­were all sim­i­lar ­between ­groups. Furthermore, ­both ­groups report­ed sim­i­lar die­tary com­pli­ance. Both ­groups ­reduced ­body ­mass, BMI, LBM, ­girth meas­ure­ments, and ­increased V.O2max (mlO2·kg-1·min-1) sig­nif­i­cant­ly and sim­i­lar­ly.
Conclusions. African-American and Caucasian women ­respond the ­same phys­io­log­i­cal­ly to ­weight ­loss inter­ven­tion. The high­er prev­a­lence in obes­ity for African-American women is not due to a dif­fer­ent phys­io­log­i­cal ­response to ­diet and exer­cise.

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