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THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
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  DOSIMETRY IN NUCLEAR MEDICINE - PART II


The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular imaging 2011 April;55(2):116-25

Copyright © 2011 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Clinical applications of dosimetry for mIBG therapy

Flux G. D. 1, Chittenden S. J. 1, Saran F. 2, Gaze M. N. 3

1 Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust & Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, UK 2 Department of Pediatrics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey, UK 3 Department of Radiotherapy, University College Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK


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Metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG), developed 30 years ago, is taken up by tumours expressing the noradrenaline transporter. Radiolabelled with I-123 or I-131, mIBG has become a gold standard for diagnostic imaging of pediatric and adult neuroendocrine cancer. Within a few years of its clinical introduction, I-131 mIBG was found to be an effective palliative treatment with minimal toxicity that in some cases could produce a complete response. The importance of internal dosimetry for I-131 mIBG therapy has been demonstrated by a number of studies showing that absorbed doses delivered to tumours and organs-at-risk from standard and weight-based activities can vary by an order of magnitude. However, significant correlations between the whole-body absorbed dose and myelotoxicity have been demonstrated and studies based on this relationship have enabled treatments to be tailored to the individual. Ongoing developments include patient-specific treatment planning based on tumour dosimetry and cocktails of radionuclides and radiosensitisers.

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glenn.flux@icr.ac.uk