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THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2008 December;52(4):388-402

Copyright © 2008 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

MIBG scintigraphy for the diagnosis and follow-up of children with neuroblastoma

Boubaker A. 1, 2, Bischof Delaloye A. 1, 2

1 Service of Nuclear Medicine Vaudois University Hospital Center, Lausanne, Switzerland 2 University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland


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Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the commonest extra-cranial solid tumor in children and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in childhood between the age of 1 to 4 years. NBL may behave in very different ways, from the less aggressive stage 4S NBL or congenital forms that may resolve without treatment in up to 90% of the children, to the high-risk disseminated stage 4 disease in older children with a cure rate of 35 to 40%. Initial staging is crucial for effective management and radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) with iodine-123 is a powerful tool with a sensitivity around 90% and a specificity close to 100% for the diagnosis of NBL. MIBG scintigraphy is used routinely and is mandatory in most investigational clinical trials both for the initial staging of the disease, the evaluation of the response to treatment, as well as for the detection of recurrence during follow-up. With respect to outcome of children presenting disseminated stage 4 NBL, the role of post-therapeutic [123I]MIBG scan has been investigated by several groups but so far there is no consensus whereas a complete or very good partial response as assessed by MIBG may be of prognostic value. NBL needs a multimodality approach at diagnosis and during follow-up and MIBG scintigraphy keeps its pivotal role, in particular with respect to bone marrow involvement and/or cortical bone metastases.

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