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THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2007 June;51(2):164-81

Copyright © 2007 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Role of in vivo imaging of the central nervous system for developing novel drugs

Rueger M. A., Kracht L. W., Hilker R., Thiel A., Sobesky J., Winkeler A., Thomas A. V., Heneka M. T., Graf R., Herholz K., Heiss W. D., Jacobs A. H.

Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging Max Planck-Institute for Neurological Research Center Centre for Molecular Medicine (CMMC) and Department of Neurology University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany


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Over the past decade imaging technologies employed in clinical neurosciences have significantly advanced. Imaging is not only used for the diagnostic work-up of neurological disorders but also crucial to follow up on therapeutic efforts. Using disease-specific imaging parameters, as read-outs for the efficiency of individual therapies, has facilitated the development of various novel treatments for neurological disease. Here, we review various imaging technologies, such as cranial computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), with respect to their current applications in non-invasive disease phenotyping and the measurement of therapeutic outcomes in neurology. In particular, applications in neuro-oncology, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and cerebral ischemia are discussed. Non-invasive imaging provides further insights into the molecular pathophysiology of human diseases and facilitates the design and implementation of improved therapies.

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