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FASCICOLI E ARTICOLI   I PIÙ LETTI   eTOC

ULTIMO FASCICOLOTHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,413

Periodicità: Trimestrale

ISSN 1824-4785

Online ISSN 1827-1936

 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2006 Giugno;50(2):121-30

INFLAMMATION AND INFECTION PART 1 

 REVIEWS

FDG-PET for imaging of non-osseous infection and inflammation

Vos F. J. 1, 2, Bleeker-Rovers C. P. 1, 2, 3, Corstens F. H. M. 2, 3, Kullberg B. J. 1, 2, Oyen W. J. G. 2, 3

1 Department of Internal Medicine, Nijmegen Medical Centre Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2 Nijmegen University Centre for Infectious Diseases Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen Medical Centre Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

FDG-PET is emerging as a promising imaging technique in non-osseous infectious and inflammatory diseases, as an increasing number of reports are appearing in literature. In general, sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing non-osseous infections compares favorably to other diagnostic modalities. Lower specificity due to FDG accumulation in conditions involving leukocyte activation and malignancy may be overcome by implementing FDG-PET in a diagnostic protocol. In fever of unknown origin, FDG-PET appears to be of great advantage as malignancy, inflammation and infection can be detected. Studies on standardized uptake value ratios, uptake patterns and dynamics may be helpful to increase specificity. Image fusion combining PET and CT facilitates anatomical localization of increased FDG-uptake and better guiding for further diagnostic tests to achieve a final diagnosis. More data on the utility of FDG-PET to monitor the response to treatment will be available in near future. Early reports on FDG-PET during treatment follow-up in large vessel vasculitis already showed promising results. In conclusion, the body of evidence on the utility of FDG-PET in non-osseous infection and inflammation is growing and FDG-PET may become one of the preferred diagnostic procedures for these diseases.

lingua: Inglese


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