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ULTIMO FASCICOLOTHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2006 Marzo;50(1):68-77

PET/CT 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Clinical impact of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in cancer patients A comparative study between dedicated camera and dual-head coincidence gamma camera

Andrieux A. 1, Switsers O. 1, Chajari M. H. 2, Jacob J. H. 3, Delozier T. 4, Gervais R. 5, Allouache N. 6, Laurençon V. 6, Henry-Amar M. 6, Bardet S. 1

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine François Baclesse Center, Caen, France
2 Digestive Pluridisciplinary Committee François Baclesse Center, Caen, France
3 Breast Pluridisciplinary Committee François Baclesse Center, Caen, France
4 Thoracic Pluridisciplinary Committee François Baclesse Center, Caen, France
5 Genitourinary Pluridisciplinary Committee François Baclesse Center, Caen, France
6 Department of Clinical Research François Baclesse Center, Caen, France

Aim. Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be performed using a dedicated PET scanner (PET-I) or a dual-head coincidence gamma camera (CGC-I). The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the impact of PET-I and CGC-I on clinical management in cancer patients.
Methods. From November 2000 to November 2002, PET-I and CGC-I were performed at an interval of 2 days in 151 patients with colorectal cancer (n=40), breast cancer (n=28), thyroid cancer (n=23), lung tumors (n=22), germ cell tumors (n=14), unknown primary cancer (n=7) and other cancers (n=17). PET-I and CGC-I were interpreted independently with knowledge of conventional imaging (CI). In June 2003, theoretical management, e.g. treatment modality/ies and treatment intent (curative or palliative), after CI, PET-I and CGC-I were stated during multidisciplinary sessions and were a posteriori considered as appropriate or inappropriate using pathological and follow-up data.
Results. The theoretical management proposed after PET-I and after CGC-I was similar in 112/151 (74%; 95% CI: 66-81%) patients. In 125 assessable patients, theoretical management after PET-I was appropriate in 86% (95% CI: 79-92%), significantly higher (P=0.0033) than after CGC-I (70%; 95% CI: 62-78%). Both proportions were also higher than after CI (46%; 95% CI: 37-56%), (P<0.0001). A similar trend for higher proportions of appropriate management after PET-I than after CGC-I was observed for each tumor localization.
Conclusion. The clinical impact of PET-I is superior to that of CGC-I in a large series of cancer patients. Although CGC-I could be considered as an acceptable alternative, PET-I remains the standard and should preferably equip nuclear medicine departments.

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