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THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
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REVIEW ARTICLES  NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY: THE PRESENT AND THE FUTURE
Guest Editors: R. Sciagrà and J. J. Bax


The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2005 March;49(1):72-80

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Coronary artery disease. The other half of the heaven

Milan E.

PET Center, Nuclear Medicine Unit S. Giacomo Apostolo Hospital, Castelfranco Veneto (TV), Italy


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Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States as well as in most of the industrialized world. Emerging data have displayed important sex-based differences in CAD: its pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategies, response to therapies, and adverse outcomes. Although the incidence of CAD has doubled among women in the past decade, and the rate of women referred to diagnostic testing and revascularization has increased, this disease in female population is still identified less often, at a later stage and treated less aggressively than in men. Significant advances have been made in scintigraphic myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of ischemia, determination of prognosis, assessment of viability and evaluation of the efficacy of revascularization. With the introduction of technetium-99m perfusion agents, gated single photon emission computed tomography and attenuation correction, myocardial perfusion imaging in women has achieved as high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CAD as that observed in men and can be considered an adequate noninvasive test to follow-up women with heart disease.

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