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THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

Rivista di Medicina Nucleare e Imaging Molecolare


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine 2000 September;44(3):224-35

lingua: Inglese

Engineering membrane proteins for nuclear medicine: applications for gene therapy and cell tracking

Bogdanov A. A. Jr., Simonova M., Weissleder R.

From the Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown MA, USA


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Nuclear imag­ing tech­niques ­such as PET and ­SPECT imag­ing are expect­ed to ­play ­major ­roles in eval­u­at­ing the effi­ca­cy of in ­vivo ­gene ther­a­py. In par­tic­u­lar, the quan­tifi­ca­tion of vec­tor deliv­ery and imag­ing the effi­ca­cy of ­gene expres­sion are of key inter­ests in test­ing new treat­ment par­a­digms and in design­ing nov­el vec­tors. In ­this ­review arti­cle we illus­trate how nucle­ar imag­ing can be ­used to ­image nov­el ­cell-sur­face ­expressed ­fusion pro­teins and how ­this strat­e­gy can be ­used to ­probe for phe­no­typ­ic chang­es in genet­i­cal­ly manip­u­lat­ed ­cells. Since the ­described ­approach ­uses new ­fusion pro­teins, typ­i­cal­ly not ­present on eukar­yot­ic ­cells, ­such “arti­fi­cial recep­tors” can be ­designed to ­bind radio­iso­topes cur­rent­ly in clin­i­cal use. The ­described ­fusion pro­teins con­sist of 1) a bind­ing ­domain ­such as a pep­tide ­based che­la­tor ­that ­binds 99mTc oxo­tech­ne­tate and 2) a mem­brane anchor­ing ­domain. A varie­ty of ­fusion pro­teins ­have ­been test­ed so far and the ­most prom­is­ing one to ­date con­sists of a met­al­loth­ion­e­in (MT)-­derived C-ter­mi­nal pep­tide ­fused to a ­type II mem­brane pro­tein mark­ers con­tain­ing the N-ter­mi­nal mem­brane anchor­ing ­domain of neu­tral endo­pep­ti­dase (PEP). Cell-sur­face expres­sion of MT in trans­fect­ed ­cells has ­been dem­on­strat­ed ­using mono­clo­nal anti­bod­ies in ­vitro. Both in ­vitro and in ­vivo trans­che­la­tion experi­ments ­have con­firmed expres­sion of 99mTc-bind­ing ­sites in eukar­yot­ic ­cells. We ­expect the ­described ­approach to ­evolve ­into a use­ful strat­e­gy to “tag” trans­fect­ed ­cells ­with 99mTc and ­thus assess­ing effi­cien­cy of ­gene deliv­ery and expres­sion.

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