Home > Riviste > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences > Fascicoli precedenti > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2015 March;59(1) > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2015 March;59(1):73-8

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti

JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGICAL SCIENCES

Rivista di Neurochirurgia


Indexed/Abstracted in: e-psyche, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Neuroscience Citation Index, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,651


eTOC

 

REVIEWS  


Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2015 March;59(1):73-8

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Hemicraniectomy for malignant middle cerebral artery territory infarction: an updated review

Taylor B. 1, 2, 3, Lopresti M. 2, Appelboom G. 1, 2, Sander Connolly Jr. E. 1, 2, 4

1 Department of Neurosurgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA;
2 Cerebrovascular Lab, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA;
3 College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA;
4 Neurocritical Care, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA


PDF  


A decompressive hemicraniectomy is frequently performed for patients with malignant middle cerebral artery territory infarction (MMI) to reduce the intracranial hypertension, which may otherwise result in transtentorial herniation. However, certain clinically significant issues ‑ diagnostic criteria, predictors of the MMI clinical course, benefit of surgery in certain populations, timing of surgery ‑ are unresolved. In this article, we provide an updated review on the diagnosis and management of MMI. An extensive search of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane was conducted using varying combinations of the search terms, “hemicraniectomy,” “decompressive craniectomy,” “malignant middle cerebral artery territory infarction,” “massive middle cerebral artery territory infarction,” “massive ischemic stroke,” “decompressive surgery,” and “neurosurgery for ischemic stroke.” Several large, randomized trials within the past decade have firmly established the benefit of decompressive hemicraniectomy (DHC) as a treatment of MMI. Further studies since then have not only better characterized the diagnosis and predictors of MMI, but have also shown that this benefit extends to patients with additional clinical and demographic characteristics. Future randomized studies should continue to evaluate the benefit of a DHC in other subgroups, and assess neurocognitive and psychosocial secondary outcomes.

inizio pagina

Publication History

Per citare questo articolo

Corresponding author e-mail

gappelbo@gmail.com