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Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2014 Settembre;58(3):129-44

lingua: Inglese

Structural and connectomic neuroimaging for the personalized study of longitudinal alterations in cortical shape, thickness and connectivity after traumatic brain injury

Irimia A. 1, Goh S.-Y. 1, Torgerson C. M. 1, Vespa P. M. 2, Van Horn J. D. 1

1 Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA;
2 Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA


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The integration of longitudinal brain structure analysis with neurointensive care strategies continues to be a substantial difficulty facing the traumatic brain injury (TBI) research community. For patient-tailored case analysis, it remains challenging to establish how lesion profile modulates longitudinal changes in cortical structure and connectivity, as well as how these changes lead to behavioral, cognitive and neural dysfunction. Additionally, despite the clinical potential of morphometric and connectomic studies, few analytic tools are available for their study in TBI. Here we review the state of the art in structural and connectomic neuroimaging for the study of TBI and illustrate a set of recently-developed, patient-tailored approaches for the study of TBI-related brain atrophy and alterations in morphometry as well as inter-regional connectivity. The ability of such techniques to quantify how injury modulates longitudinal changes in cortical shape, structure and circuitry is highlighted. Quantitative approaches such as these can be used to assess and monitor the clinical condition and evolution of TBI victims, and can have substantial translational impact, especially when used in conjunction with measures of neuropsychological function.

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jvanhorn@usc.edu