Ricerca avanzata

Home > Riviste > International Angiology > Fascicoli precedenti > International Angiology 2009 Dicembre;28(6) > International Angiology 2009 Dicembre;28(6):458-60



Rivista di Angiologia

Official Journal of the International Union of Angiology, the International Union of Phlebology and the Central European Vascular Forum
Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,899

Periodicità: Bimestrale

ISSN 0392-9590

Online ISSN 1827-1839


International Angiology 2009 Dicembre;28(6):458-60

 Original articles

Peroneal nerve injury during varicose veins surgery

Herman J., Sekanina Z., Utikal P., Bachleda P., Duda M.

Second Clinic of Surgery, Teaching Hospital of Palacky, University of Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic

AIM: The aim of the presented work was to assess the causes of injury to great nerves during varicose vein surgery and comment on the consequences.
METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 2 344 patients operated on for primary varicose veins between the years 1980 and 2005.
RESULTS: In three patients out of 2 344 the peroneal nerve was injured. The three patients underwent neurosurgery. In the first patient transplantation of the sacral nerve was performed. In the second patient the nerve was released from ligatures, and in the third patient the nerve was first released from the cicatrice and the transposition of the tendon of the posterior tibial muscle followed. All three patients went through intensive rehabilitation. The first patient still wears peroneal splint, the limb is atrophic. In the second patient the function has been well restored and he is not disabled anymore. However, the restitution of the lower limb function is not sufficient for him to work as a teacher of physical education. The third patient still suffers from serious paresis of the peroneal nerve.
CONCLUSIONS: Even a frequent and relatively simple intervention such as varicose vein surgery may be accompanied by serious complications affecting patients for the rest of their lives. Serious motor nerve injuries are encountered only in operations in the popliteal fossa and the fibula head. Complications are more frequent when operations are performed by young general surgeons than when they are performed by an experienced surgeon or an expert in vascular surgery. The affected patients should be referred for neurosurgery; however, results are unpredictable. In spite of an intensive rehabilitation and possible plastic surgery the patients are permanently affected.

lingua: Inglese


inizio pagina