Home > Riviste > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine > Fascicoli precedenti > Europa Medicophysica 2004 September;40(3) > Europa Medicophysica 2004 September;40(3):223-232

ULTIMO FASCICOLO
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Estratti

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

Rivista di Medicina Fisica e Riabilitativa dopo Eventi Patologici


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
In association with International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM)
Indexed/Abstracted in: CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,063


eTOC

 

  OSTEOPOROTIC PATIENT REHABILITATION


Europa Medicophysica 2004 September;40(3):223-232

Copyright © 2004 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

lingua: Inglese

Steps for targeting exercise towards the skeleton to increase bone strength

Warden S. J. 1, 2, Fuchs R. K. 3, Turner C. H. 1, 4

1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA
2 Department of Physical Therapy School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Indiana University, IN, USA
3 Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA
4 Biomechanics and Biophysical Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA


FULL TEXT  


Osteoporosis is a dis­ease of ­bone fra­gil­ity result­ing most­ly ­from low ­bone ­mass and a con­com­i­tant ­increase in the ­risk for frac­ture. Exercise is a com­mon­ly pre­scribed inter­ven­tion for oste­o­por­o­sis ­because ­bone tis­sue is mechan­o­sen­si­tive. The abil­ity of mechan­i­cal stim­u­li to influ­ence ­bone biol­o­gy has ­been ­known for ­over a cen­tu­ry, but it has ­been ­only in the ­past sev­er­al ­decades ­that ­great ­gains ­have ­been ­made in ­terms of under­stand­ing fac­tors ­that influ­ence ­this ­response. By under­stand­ing ­these fac­tors, ­steps can be devel­oped to max­imize the oste­o­gen­ic ­effects of exer­cise on the skele­ton and poten­tial­ly ­reduce the inci­dence of ­bone frac­tures. This ­paper out­lines ­these ­steps. They ­include: 1) start­ing exer­cise ­when ­young ­while the skele­ton is ­most respon­sive to mechan­i­cal stim­u­li; 2) select­ing exer­cis­es ­that are dynam­ic and ­high-­impact to max­imize oste­o­gen­ic respons­es, ­such as jump­ing for the low­er extrem­ity and rac­quet ­sports for the ­upper extrem­ity; 3) exer­cis­ing the spe­cif­ic skel­e­tal ­regions you ­want to strength­en as the ­bone ­response to mechan­i­cal load­ing is high­ly ­site-spe­cif­ic; 4) exer­cis­ing brief­ly, yet ­often to off­set the desen­si­ti­za­tion of skel­e­tal mechan­o­trans­duction path­ways; and 5) con­tin­u­ing to exer­cise as you age to pre­vent ­bone ­loss and ­reduce the ­risk of ­falls. Following ­these ­steps ­will ­help to pro­mote skel­e­tal ­health at all ­ages and may ­reduce an indi­vid­u­als ­risk for frac­ture by aug­ment­ing ­bone ­mass and ­size dur­ing ­youth, ­while reduc­ing age-relat­ed ­bone ­loss and the ­risk for ­falls in adult­hood.

inizio pagina

Publication History

Per citare questo articolo

Corresponding author e-mail