Home > Journals > Italian Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery > Past Issues > Giornale Italiano di Chirurgia Vascolare 1999 September;6(3) > Giornale Italiano di Chirurgia Vascolare 1999 September;6(3):215-26

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

ITALIAN JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Vascular and Endovascular Surgery


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, Emerging Sources Citation Index, Scopus


eTOC

 

HISTORY OF VASCULAR SURGERY: PERSONALITIES, TECHNIQUES, TURNING POINTS  


Giornale Italiano di Chirurgia Vascolare 1999 September;6(3):215-26

Copyright © 2000 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English, Italian

Michele Serveto d’Aragona and the lesser circulation

Argenteri A.

From the Department of Vascular Surgery University of Pavia, Italy Division of Vascular Surgery, Polo Universitario Istituto di Cura, Città di Pavia


PDF  


Miguel Servet y Rives (Michele Serveto), a Spaniard ­from Saragossa who was ­born in 1510 and was ­burnt at the ­stake in 1543 by the Inquisition, ­remains one of the ­most mys­ter­i­ous and fas­ci­nat­ing fig­ures of the 16th cen­tu­ry. A theo­lo­gian, phi­los­o­pher, geog­ra­pher, astron­o­mer, astrol­o­ger and phy­si­cian, he embod­ies the pur­est and ­most com­plete expres­sion of Renaissance man pro­ject­ed ­towards new ­faiths, in eve­ry ­field. While ­still a ­young man, his inquir­ing and live­ly ­mind led him to ­write “Trinitatis error­i­bus” ­whose con­tents imme­di­ate­ly result­ed in an inqui­si­to­ri­al ­trial and sub­se­quent con­dem­na­tion. The ­author was ­forced to ­take ref­uge in Lyons ­where he start­ed his med­i­cal stud­ies. He stud­ied med­i­cine ­under Jacob Dubois (Sylvius) in Paris, and it is ­from ­this ­date ­that his friend­ship ­with Vesalius ­also ­dates. The meet­ing of ­these two live­ly ­minds ­laid the ear­ly foun­da­tions for the ­future Galenic rev­o­lu­tion. Serveto ­then ­moved to Vienne, a ­city in the Dauphiné, ­where he ­worked as a doc­tor with­out aban­don­ing his theo­log­i­cal and phil­o­soph­i­cal stud­ies. He ­entered ­into a ­long cor­re­spon­dence ­with Calvin, but ­their ide­as and char­ac­ters ­were rad­i­cal­ly dif­fer­ent: as a ­result of ­this ­clash, Calvin him­self anon­y­mous­ly ­denounced Serveto’s ­book “Christianismi resti­tu­tio” to the Inquisition. He was impris­oned but man­aged to ­escape to Geneva ­where he was recap­tured, ­tried and sen­tenced to the ­stake. In ­this ­last ­book, writ­ten ­against a theo­log­i­cal back­ground, Serveto ded­i­cates six pag­es to his intui­tions regard­ing the pul­mo­nary cir­cu­la­tion, over­throw­ing Galenic dog­ma on the sub­ject. The descrip­tion of the less­er cir­cu­la­tion is ana­lyt­i­cal and pre­cise, start­ing ­from the pre­sump­tion ­that ­there ­were no ­pores in the inter­ven­tric­u­lar sep­tum, as was ­thought at the ­time. Above all, his intui­tion was ­opposed to the the­o­ries of Realdo Colombo, who ­despite ­being ­more accu­rate ­than the Spanish ­author, pub­lished his ­data post­hu­mous­ly in 1559.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail