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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2017 May 09

DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07414-X

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The feasibility of an exercise program for individuals 12 months post-stroke in a small urban community

David JAGROOP 1, Amy, MAEBRAE-WALLER 2, Shilpa DOGRA 1

1 Faculty of Health Sciences (Kinesiology), University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada; 2 District Stroke Centre, Lakeridge Health, Oshawa, ON, Canada


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BACKGROUND: There are few community-based exercise programs catering to individuals post-stroke, despite an increasing need. The primary objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of running a community-based exercise program for individuals post-stroke, and to provide a framework for local communities to run similar programs.
METHODS: Individuals who had a stroke within 12 months of the start of the program were eligible to participate in a 9-week community-based exercise program. Sit to stand, grip strength, arm curl, timed up and go, 6-minute walk, Berg Balance Scale, Stroke Specific Quality of Life, and Exercise Self-Efficacy were assessed pre and post-program to determine the effectiveness of the program. Caregivers of participants were invited to participate in a focus group after the program (n=5) to better understand program feasibility and areas for improvement.
RESULTS: Individuals (males n=9, females n=1) with stroke were recruited from a local rehabilitation program within 1 week (aged 72.7 + 9.3 years). The ratio of volunteers to participants was 1:2. All participants completed the exercise program and pre-post-testing. Significant improvements were observed for sit to stand (7.6 + 3.4 to 9.8 + 4.3 repetitions, p<0.01), grip strength of the non-affected side (29.7 + 8.9 to 32.6 + 8.3 lbs p=0.04), arm curl (15.2 + 6.1 to 19.9 + 4.7 repetitions p=0.04), and Exercise Self-Efficacy (z=2.50, p=0.01, r=0.79) from pre to post-program. Caregivers suggested increasing the frequency of the program.
CONCLUSIONS: An effective community-based exercise program for individuals post-stroke can be run at community centres utilizing qualified volunteers.


KEY WORDS: Functional capacity - Older adults – Autonomy - Cardiovascular disease

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Cite this article as

Jagroop D, Dogra S. The feasibility of an exercise program for individuals 12 months post-stroke in a small urban community. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017 May 09. DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07414-X 

Corresponding author e-mail

david.jagroop@uoit.net