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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 Nov 30

Effects of a trail mountain race on neuromuscular performance and hydration status in trained runners

Ernest BAIGET 1, Javier PEÑA 1, Xantal BORRÀS 1, Toni CAPARRÓS 1, José L. LÓPEZ 1, Francesc MARIN 1, Jordi COMA 1, Eduard COMERMA 2

1 Sport Performance Analysis Research Group, University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain; 2 Physical Activity Sciences Department, University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain

BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were (a) to examine the effects of a trail mountain race (TMR) on hydration status and neuromuscular performance of recreational trail runners and (b) to determine the relationship among these parameters, subject’s characteristics and competitive performance.
METHODS: 35 male recreational trail runners (age, 38.1 ± 9.5 years; height, 177.3 ± 5.8 cm; body mass, 73.8 ± 8.4 kg; mean ± SD) were assessed before and after a 21.1 km TMR. Hydration status (urine color [Ucol] and body mass [BM]) and neuromuscular performance (countermovement jump [CMJ] and rebound jumps [RJ]) were assessed.
RESULTS: Significant changes following the TMR included RJ mean contact time (RJMCT) (12%, ES = -0.35, p < 0.05) and dehydration status increases (BM reductions [-2.7%, ES = 0.24, p < 0.001] and Ucol [147% increase, ES = -1.8, p < 0.001]). Low to moderate positive correlations were found between pre- and post-TMR BM (r = 0.5 – 0.54; p < 0.01), post-race Ucol (r = 0.37; p < 0.05), age (r = 0.57; p < 0.01) and TMR performance. Participant’s age combined with Ucol and the RJMJH post-TMR, explained 65% of the variance in the final running time (r = 0.81; p = 0.000).
CONCLUSIONS: Participation in a 21.1 km TMR in recreational runners results in small reductions of the neuromuscular function and increases in dehydration levels. The hydration status (Ucol) and the RJMJH post-TMR combined with the runners’ chronological age seemed to be good predictors of the final running performance.

language: English


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