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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 May 03

Effect of body composition, aerobic performance and physical activity on exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy subjects

Magdalena WIECEK 1, Marcin MACIEJCZYK 1, Jadwiga SZYMURA 2, Szczepan WIECHA 3, Malgorzata KANTOROWICZ 4, Zbigniew SZYGULA 5

1 Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Physical Education in Krakow, Poland; 2 Department of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor Rehabilitation, University of Physical Education in Krakow, Poland; 3 Faculty of Tourism and Health, Jozef Pilsudski University of Physical Education in Warsaw, Branch in Biala Podlaska, Poland; 4 PhD Student, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Physical Education in Krakow, Poland; 5 Department of Sports Medicine and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport in University of Physical Education, Krakow, Poland

BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress could be result of an increase in ATP resynthesis during exercise. The aim of the study was to compare prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB) disturbances induced by exercise at maximal intensity in young men with differing body compositions.
METHODS: Thirty-nine subjects were selected from 1,549 volunteers aged 18-30, based on lean body mass (LBM) and percentage of body fat (%BF), and then assigned into groups: CON, average LBM (59.0-64.3 kg), average %BF (14.0-18.5%); HBF, high %BF> 21.5%, average LBM; HLBM, high LBM> 66.3 kg, average %BF. Participants’ physical activity was determined. A running test with a gradually increased load was used. Before and 3 minutes after exercise, total oxidative status (TOS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were determined in the plasma, and the oxidative stress index (OSI =TOS/TAC) was calculated.
RESULTS: Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was comparable in the HBF and HLBM groups (53.12±1.51 mlkg-1 and 50.25±1.27 mlkg-1, respectively) and significantly lower compared to the CON group (58.23±1.62 mlkg-1). The CON, HBF and HLBM groups showed similar significant (P<0.05) increases in TOS levels (36%, 35% and 31%, respectively). Post- exercise TAC increased by 8% in the HBF and HLBM groups (P<0.05), compared to the 3% increase in the CON group (P>0.05). There was significant negative correlation between OSI, measured before and after exercise, and participants’ physical activity. There was no correlation between OSI and VO2max, BM, LBM, %BF and BMI.
CONCLUSIONS: Exercise at maximal intensity causes a similar increase in TOS and in TAC in subjects with increased %BF and elevated content of LBM and regardless of body composition, the ratios of TOS/TAC concentrations before and after maximal-intensity exercise, have lower values in people with higher physical activity levels and are not dependent on aerobic performance (VO2max).

language: English


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