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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 September;56(9):980-9

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Muscle synergies during incremental rowing VO2max test of collegiate rowers and untrained subjects

Shazlin SHAHARUDIN 1, 2, Sunil AGRAWAL 3

1 Exercise and Sports Science Program, School of Health Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, Malaysia; 2 Biomechanics and Movement Science Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA; 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the muscle synergies during incremental rowing VO2 max Test of collegiate rowers and untrained subjects. As a power endurance sport, high aerobic capacity was one of the determinants of rowing performance. The modulation of muscle recruitment patterns following specific physiological demands was an indication of the robustness of muscle synergies composition which was overlooked in previous studies.
METHODS: Ten male collegiate rowers and physically active untrained subjects were recruited. Muscle synergies were extracted from 16 rowing-specific muscles using Principal Component Analysis with varimax rotation. Incremental rowing VO2 max Test was performed on slides ergometer (SE). Rowing performance and physiological variables were analyzed.
RESULTS: Rowers exerted greater power output, more energy expenditure and better rowing economy compared to untrained subjects. Rowers preferred to row slower with longer strokes compared to the untrained subjects. Three muscle synergies with high indices of similarity of waveform patterns were extracted in both groups. Significant association was found between muscle synergies and rowing economy.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that muscle synergies were robust during aerobic-dominant activity for collegiate rowers and untrained subjects. Rowers and coaches could utilize the findings by emphasizing on muscle coordination training, which may enhance the rowing economy.

language: English


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