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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 June;56(6):789-93

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

    CASE REPORTS

Exertional rhabdomyolysis after spinning: case series and review of the literature

Austin J. RAMME 1, Shaleen VIRA 1, Michael J. ALAIA 1, Jonathan VAN DE LEUV 2, Robert C. ROTHBERG 2

1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY, USA; 2 Department of Emergency Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA

Spinning is a popular indoor stationary cycling program that uses group classes as a motivational tool. Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is frequently reported in athletes and military recruits; however, infrequently it has been reported after spinning class. ER is diagnosed by clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory values. Hydration, electrolyte management, and pain control are key components to treatment of this condition. Severe cases can be complicated by acute renal failure, compartment syndrome, arrhythmia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We describe three cases of admission due to rhabdomyolysis after spinning. The diagnosis, admission criteria, and medical treatment of ER are presented in the context of a literature review. A retrospective review of three cases with review of the current literature. The medical and laboratory records of three patient cases were reviewed. A search of the PubMed database was used to perform a comprehensive review of exertional rhabdomyolysis. Our institution’s IRB reviewed this study. We report three cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis after spinning and describe the diagnostic workup and medical management of these patients. The diagnosis of ER is made by clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory values. The disease spectrum ranges from mild to severe with the potential of serious complications in some patients. We demonstrate three cases of ER in deconditioned individuals who presented to the emergency department for evaluation. Careful medical management and patient monitoring resulted in improved patient symptomatology and eventual return to physical activity.

language: English


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