Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 May;56(5) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 May;56(5):616-23

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Cite this article as

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,215


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  SPORT CARDIOLOGY


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 May;56(5):616-23

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Acute hemodynamic and cardiovascular responses following resistance exercise to voluntary exhaustion. Effects of different loadings and exercise durations

Terje GJOVAAG 1, Asmund K. HJELMELAND 2, Jonas B. ØYGARD 2, Harald VIKNE 3, Peyman MIRTAHERI 4

1 Department of Occupational Therapy, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, Norway; 2 Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, Norway; 3 Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; 4 Department of Industrial Development, Faculty of Technology, Art and Design, Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, Norway


PDF  


BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the acute hemodynamic and cardiovascular responses of high load/low repetition resistance training (RT) to low load/high repetition RT.
METHODS: Thirteen healthy men performed four sets of 4 repetition maximum (RM) and 20RM leg-extensions without breath-holding. The RT was conducted in a randomized order and with 48 hours between bouts. Non-invasive beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood-pressure (SBP/DBP) was measured on the finger, while non-invasive cardiac output (CO) was assessed beat-to-beat by impedance-cardiography.
RESULTS: Mean±SD resting SBP/DBP and CO were 126±14/73±9 mmHg and 5.6±9 L min-1, respectively. Exercise SBP/DBP values increased to 154±22/99 ±18 and 203±33/126±19 mmHg following 4RM and 20RM RT, respectively (compared to rest, all; P<0.001), and 20RM SBP/DBP values were higher than 4RM values (both, P<0.001). The SBP increased from the first to the fourth set of exercise following the 20RM load (P<0.01), but not so for the 4RM load. Exercise SBP/DBP values following the 4th rep of 20RM exercise (154±18/91±14), was similar to the 4RM values, but different to the 20th rep of the 20 RM loading (both; P<0.001). CO increased to 10.8±2.6 and 13.9±2.2 L min-1, following 4RM and 20RM RT, respectively (compared to rest, both; P<0.001) and 20RM CO was higher than 4RM CO (P<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: 20RM RT resulted in higher blood-pressure than 4RM RT when performed to voluntary exhaustion. Differences in hemodynamic responses seems to be related to training duration and not to difference in loading.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Gjovaag T, Hjelmeland AK, Øygard JB, Vikne H, Mirtaheri P. Acute hemodynamic and cardiovascular responses following resistance exercise to voluntary exhaustion. Effects of different loadings and exercise durations. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2016 May;56(5):616-23. 

Corresponding author e-mail

terje.gjovaag@hioa.no