Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 April;56(4) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 April;56(4):443-9

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,215


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  BODY COMPOSITION, NUTRITION


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 April;56(4):443-9

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Accuracy of self-perception and Body Mass Index compared to actual body fat percentage in athletes and non-athletes

Aubrianne E. ROTE 1, Emily PINEDA 2, Olivia WELLS 3, Amy J. LANOU 1, Jason R. WINGERT 1

1 Department of Health and Wellness, University of North Carolina-Asheville, Asheville, NC, USA; 2 Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 3 Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC, USA


PDF  


BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of self-reported weight status compared to weight status based on actual body fat percentage in athletes and non-athletes.
METHODS: Adult athletes (N.=76; 43 female and 33 male) and non-athletes (N.=80; 43 female and 37 male) participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were asked to identify their perceived weight status. Height and weight were measured, and BMI was calculated. Body fat percentage was assessed using BOD POD. Cross-tabs analyses were used to determine agreement between perceived weight status, weight status based on body fat percentage, and weight status based on BMI.
RESULTS: Overall, agreement between perceived weight status and actual weight status based on body fat percentage was fair. Of the 43 overweight/obese participants, 42% under-estimated weight status, thinking they were normal weight. Of the 114 normal weight participants, 6% over-estimated their weight status, thinking they were overweight. Although there were lower rates of overweight/obesity among athletes, 50% of overweight/obese athletes thought they were normal weight, while 39% of overweight/obese non-athletes thought they were normal weight. None of the normal weight athletes (N.=56) over-estimated their weight status. In contrast, 20% of male non-athletes, and 9% of female non-athletes who were normal weight thought they were overweight.
CONCLUSIONS: Similar to trends observed in recent studies, results from the current study indicate that a high proportion of overweight/obese adults underestimate their weight status, and athletes may not be immune to this trend. Reasons as to why this phenomenon may be occurring and future directions are discussed.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail

arote@unca.edu